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Archive for January 2012

Thought you-all might enjoy my guest visit today on Eileen Rife’s blog. She’s the author of the Born for India trilogy. Her most recent novel, Second Chance, will release in a month.

http://www.eileen-rife.blogspot.com

 

Just saw this on WordPress. So true!

Easy reading is damn hard writing. — Nathaniel Hawthorne

ImageJust wanted to let you know that for a limited time “Winds of Wyoming” is FREE on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Winds-Wyoming-Neilson-Novel-ebook/dp/B006SPP7G8/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1326999416&sr=1-1

 

ImageYears ago, in my early writing days, I heard a writing conference  speaker offer this pithy advice: “Look up.” We humans tend to look down, he said, or around us, but rarely above our heads. Looking up can expand our world view and draw us outside of ourselves. As a result, we’ll be better people and better writers.

One of the psalmists wrote this in the Bible: “I lift up my eyes to the hills–where does my help come from? My help comes from the Lord, the Maker of heaven and earth.” (Psalms 121:1-2) Two psalms later, the thought was repeated, though a bit differently. “I lift up my eyes to you, to you whose throne is in heaven.” (123:1)

I love living near mountains and watching the sky change above them, whether it’s the morphing of sunrise and sunset colors or storms building and bursting. But I forget to regularly look at the sky directly above me. When I do, I feel my soul stretch and burst from it’s husk of worries and to-do list concerns. I feel freedom and sense possibilities. I’m also reminded of our Creator God, who made the mountains and the sky and whose “throne is in heaven.”

“Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.” (Hebrews 12:2)

ImageFresh out of a Pennsylvania penitentiary armed with a marketing degree, Kate Neilson heads to Wyoming anticipating an anonymous new beginning as a guest-ranch employee. A typical twenty-five-year-old woman might be looking to lasso a cowboy, but her only desire is to get on with life on the outside—despite her growing interest in the ranch owner. When she discovers a violent ex-lover followed her west, she fears the past she hoped to hide will imprison her once again.

http://www.amazon.com/Winds-Wyoming-Neilson-Novel-ebook/dp/B006SPP7G8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1325893519&sr=8-1


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